Follow The Village Footsteps of Pedro

Malaga Wine Tour

On the Malaga wine tour you will visit D/O Montilla-Moriles, a small wine region about 1.5h north of the city of Malaga which has long been famous for its tradition of sweet wine and sherry. Perhaps the most famed local wine is traditional Pedro Ximemenz (or “P.X.”), and it is also recently popping up onto all the “A-list restaurant” wine lists across continents from New York to Sydney.

Discover Pedro's small village home roots in Montilla-Moriles, with the best aged examples of PX not only displaying intense ultra-sweet aromas but also balancing flavours of chocolate, coffee and spices. Younger PX can be a liquid bonbon, full of sticky sweetness, excellent with pure chocolate desserts, crepes or even blue cheese. 

The other option is visit two contrasting cellars closer to Malaga city, one sweet wine producer as well as a modern boutique cellar producing great red, white and rose wines! Only around a half dozen wine producers remain in the D/O Malaga region, in stark contrast to the heydey of Malaga wine production in the late 19th century (before the arrival of phylloxera to southern Spain, which totally decimated the local wine industry). However, the D/O Malaga region is under a revival thanks to the introduction of excellent dry white wines (made with the local Muscat grape, but not sweet), as well as some dry reds too!

Duration: All Day (8 Hours)
From: Marbella, Malaga*
Private Tour/By Availability
Includes:
✔ Doorstep Pickup
✔ New Mercedes Minibus
✔ Cellar Fees Included
✔ Taste 3-4 Wines at Each Cellar
✔ Tasting with Tapas
✔ Visit a Wine Barrel Factory
✔ Optional Lunch
✔ Limited to 8 Guests Per Day
*Doorstep pickup from all areas between Malaga and Marbella, e.g. Mijas, Benalmadena, La Cala, Benahavis, Estepona etc.
(Larger Groups Arranged Separately)

Throughout Malaga the winemaking process has remained unchanged over the last few centuries, although it has benefited from modernised techniques and equipment. However, some of the vineyards still rest very steep hillsides, such as in the Axarquia - the name derived from the original Arabic name for Malaga).

Malaga is a mountainous area and traditionally the land of wine and grapes but now almonds, oil, citrus fruits, avocados, mangoes and other tropical fruits are also widely grown, although lacking terraces, so the grapes are harvested by hand, and occasionally with the aid of mules, a very labour-intensive process.

Process

A mountainous area and traditionally the land of wine and grapes but now almonds, oil, citrus fruits, avocados, mangoes and other tropical fruits are also widely grown, but lacking terraces, so the grapes are harvested by hand, and occasionally with the aid of mules, a very labour-intensive process.

Roman

In 44 AD, Columela wrote about the fine wines available in the Roman Province of Málaga, and during the 1500s, something had to be done to wine to allow it to last the long ocean journeys and subsequently brandy was added to allow the wine to last longer, and to be more resistant to temperature changes. This is why Málaga is often associated with "fortified wine".

Mountain Wine

Malaga in the Andalucian province of Spain is famed for sun, sea and sand but what many people don’t know is that it is also one of the oldest wine making regions in Spain.  Once known as ‘mountain wine’ Malaga wine is a wonderfully unique sweet wine made predominantly from white Moscatel  and Pedro Ximenez grapes.

Scenery

Lacking terraces the grapes are harvested by hand, and occasionally with the aid of mules, a very labour-intensive process.